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FearDotCom (2002)
Director: William Malone

review by Michael Lohr

A series of bizarre deaths rouse the suspicion of Detective Mike Reilly (Stephen Dorff) and Department of Health inspector Terry Houston (Natascha McElhone). Upon investigation they discover that all the victims' shared one common link, they visited a website called Fear.com, run by a mysterious 'black widow' woman weaving a deadly game of tag. The website features a live snuff-cam, transmitting images of brutal torture and death, and anyone who logs in becomes infected with some sort of energy force resembling the Ebola virus. Within 48 hours, the web surfers are bleeding from the eyes and hemorrhaging internally. The person behind the website, an elusive maniac known as the Doctor (played by Stephen Rea, who does a pathetic attempt at impersonating Jack Nicholson or someone severely constipated) is horrible as a villain.
   FearDotCom, hard to call it a movie really, is extremely violent, unnecessarily so. It is one of the most graphic horror films ever made and includes grotesque imagery of sadistic tortures and killings and a plethora of inept, asinine characters and is chock-a-block full of utterly wretched acting. There is no reason for such a graphic depiction violence seen here other than to shock the audience. Fortunately most people probably left the building or fell asleep and missed it.
   FearDotCom is nothing more than painfully monotonous rip-off of such films as Poltergeist and Videodrome. Even 8MM is better, though not by much.
   I have said enough.
Feardotcom

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