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Cyborg X (2016)
Director: Kevin King

review by Christopher Geary

Never mind whether Captain America will become a plain old unranked Steve Rogers in the next big Marvel movie, here is genre stalwart Danny Trejo in full-on comicbook mode as Captain Machine Gun, with Eve Mauro as Lieutenant Spears. One year after a massive wave of drone strikes wrecked civilisation, the survivors huddle in a former military camp, living in constant fear of attacks by hi-tech flying scouts and grungy robotic soldiers.

Well, no, they don't actually huddle together, depending on each other like a post-nuclear family. They simply argue the toss about who's in charge of the next suicidal mission to scavenge supplies, and they swagger around (even the women!) in unwashed army surplus outfits, re-enacting sundry American stereotypes from every clichéd desert-warfare movie that you've ever seen.

Directed by Kevin King with all the artistic panache of an industrial accident, Cyborg X is B-movie hackwork that's almost entirely derivative of the Aliens and Terminator franchises. Its hopelessly low-budget sci-fi mediocrity is without even a prosthetic leg to stand on. This is an exploitation flick with no sense of good cheesy fun to alleviate a catalogue of Z-grade flaws, and salvage even modest entertainment values from a lack of imagination.

Relying upon fan-fictional replays of various memorable scenes and/ or key moments from the aforementioned sources, King's desultory shots offer po-faced nonsense that might have seemed appealing as a just average-quality mid-week video in the 1990s. However, in today's overcrowded, ruined-by-downloads, DVD marketplace, it's likely to end up in the bargain bins of tiredly 'futuristic' and ultimately dopey action, within a week of its first release.

Cyborg X



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